Different Labels, Part 2, Vitamins

This time let’s look at what many think is real food, but is really supplements, VITAMINS. So here, again, is the difference between “supplement fats” and nutrition facts” labeling according to the FDA and USDA.

When reading some sports nutrition labels, you may notice that it lists “Supplement Facts” instead of the “Nutrition Facts” that you are accustom to seeing on food and drink labels. This is an important distinction. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) maintains a list of food ingredients that they have tested and have determined to be “Generally Regarded as Safe” (GRAS). If a product uses ingredients that are on the GRAS list in quantities determined to be safe by the FDA, then the product is considered a food and can be labeled with a Nutrition Facts label. However, if a product uses ingredients that are NOT generally regarded as safe or in quantities that have not been determined to be safe, then they are typically classified as and labeled as such with a Supplement Facts label.

As I’ve said before, if you want to make a product with ingredients that have not been determined safe for human consumption then you are free to do so with a Supplement Facts label. The label should read: Buyer Beware!

My advice? Stick to products with Nutrition Facts

Below are two more label images for Daily-Vitamins and Juice Plus Orchard capsules. As you can see, they have different label titles. So which would I advise to take for better health & nutrition, the “nutrition facts” labeled product, Juice Plus capsules. You will also see that the Juice Plus capsules are Kosher, Rabbinical Certified, and NSF tested and certified.

 

Charles Baerman PhD, CFT, CSFN, CSET, CSSF

Owner BAER Fit

937-748-9905 office

937-238-4503 cell

charles@baerfit.com


Different Labels: Food or Supplement?

I was asked by several of my clients why the different labels on items that appear to be the same. Some say “supplements” and some say “nutrition”. So here is the reason according to the FDA and USDA.

When reading some sports nutrition labels, you may notice that it lists “Supplement Facts” instead of the “Nutrition Facts” that you are accustom to seeing on food and drink labels. This is an important distinction. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) maintains a list of food ingredients that they have tested and have determined to be “Generally Regarded as Safe” (GRAS). If a product uses ingredients that are on the GRAS list in quantities determined to be safe by the FDA then the product is considered a food and can be labeled with a Nutrition Facts label. However, if a product uses ingredients that are NOT generally regarded as safe or in quantities that have not been determined to be safe, then they are typically classified as nutritional supplements in which case they are labeled as such with a Supplement Facts label.

In other words, if you want to make a product with ingredients that have not been determined whether not they are safe for human consumption then you are free to do so with a Supplement Facts label. The label should read: Buyer Beware! My advice? Stick to products with Nutrition Facts

Below are two popular shake drinks, Shakeology and Juice Plus Complete. As you can see, they have different label titles. So which would I advise to drink, the “nutrition facts” labeled product, Juice Plus Complete.

 

Charles Baerman PhD, CFT, CSFN, CSET, CSSF

Owner BAER Fit 937-748-9905 office

937-238-4503 cell

charles@baerfit.com

 


Aging & What You Can Do to Enjoy It

Over all my years, 67 now, I’ve watched as people age themselves. Yes, watched as people decreased their life span, worsened their health, committed suicide on the installment plan. And while doing this they thought they were enjoying life. Having fun. No thought for their future or for their children.

Well the news is, you can slow down the aging process. You can reverse a lot of the damage already done. You can improve at any age. I’m going to do a few articles on this very subject, so if you care…read, learn and do. First let’s look at a few findings.

In a March14, 2004, New England Journal of Medicine. A study found that men and women with the greatest capacity for exercise live the longest. This finding suggest that exercise capacity is a better predictor of longevity than any other marker. Dr. Walter Bortz, a Stanford University professor, suggests that leg strength is the best predictor of whether a person can live independently.

The following list includes information and facts regarding physical inactivity.

    • Inactivity and poor diet cause at least 300,000 deaths a year in the United States.
    • Adults who are less active are at greater risk of dying of heart disease and developing diabetes, colon cancer, and high blood pressure.
  • More than sixty percent of U.S. adults do not engage in the recommended amount of activity.
  • Approximately forty percent of U.S. adults are not active at all.

 

  • Physical inactivity is more common among older adults than it is among younger adults.
  • Inactivity increases with age. By age 75, about one in three men and one in two women engage in no physical activity.
  • Regular physical activity has a strong correlation to social support from family and friends.
  • People with disabilities are less likely to engage in regular moderate physical activity, than people with no physical disabilities; yet they have similar needs to promote health and prevent lifestyle-related disease. Science supports the idea that exercise can slow down the aging process, and researchers continue to be persuaded that fitness for older adults is a must:
  • We now know that heart disease is the result of an unhealthy lifestyle and not a factor of aging. You can have a heart attack at any age. Some experts on aging believe that total bed rest for 21 days is equivalent physically to 30 years of aging. Some scientists suggest that one hour of exercise increases life by one hour. More and more evidence supports the fact that chronological age has very little to do with aging and that your physiological age is the better predictor of your aging. It is never too late to turn back the time clock.
  • Dr. Herbert DeVries is convinced that men and women in their seventies and eighties can achieve levels of vigor usually associated with people thirty years younger.
  • Dr. Steven Blair, of the Institute for Aerobic Research in Dallas, found that as much as one and one-half of all functional decline typically associated with aging is the result of disease and can be reversed with proper exercise.
  • Dr. Walter Bortz, author and professor, said, “Our aging is in our own hands. It is no one else’s responsibility. If we depend on our doctors, our families, our government, we risk compromising the quality of our lives.” If we take charge of our lives we can ensure that our future years are creative and radiantly alive.
  • Dr. Spirduso believes that older adults who stay engaged physically, socially, and mentally age better than those who do not.
  • Dr. Fries, of Stanford University, believes that older people can age well with grace and wisdom, wit and experience, energy and vitality.
  • The bottom line is that it is never too late to feel great!

“We are under-exercised as a nation. We look instead of play. We ride instead of walk. Our existence deprives us of the minimum of physical activity essential for a healthy living.”

—John F. Kennedy

Based on recent findings, a growing number of researchers believe that with healthy lifestyles we may be able to set back the biological clock or at least slow it by as much as forty years. We need to accept the fact that the saying “use it or lose it” has real meaning if you want to maintain physical and emotional independence. Unsuccessful aging is the result of abuse, disuse, and misuse of our bodies. We are all aware that aging results in changes in each body system. These changes may contribute to a variety of health problems experienced by the older individual. However, many of the major disabilities associated with aging, such as loss of cardiovascular fitness, decrease of muscle mass, reduced bone mass, glucose intolerance, diminished immune function, and intellectual function loss, can be reversed or prevented by becoming involved in a regular and prudent comprehensive exercise program and better eating habits. Active people age at a rate of only ½ percent a year, as opposed to inactive people who age at a rate of 2 percent a year. While that does not sound like much, in reality, it takes an active person four years to age the same amount as an inactive person does in one year! According to gerontologist John Rowe, M.D., “The impact of chronological aging has been overemphasized and a substantial portion of the physical changes we consider natural to aging are actually due to lack of exercise, poor diet, and bad habits such as smoking and excessive drinking.” A growing number of researchers believe that with healthy lifestyles we may be able to set back the biological clock or at least slow it by as much as forty years. If you listed all the changes in the human body that are ascribed to aging (changes in muscles, bones, brain, cholesterol, blood pressure, sleep habits, sexual performance, and psychological inventory) and then compared the list to changes that occur in the human body due to physical inactivity, there would be a striking similarity between the two lists. The near duplication of these lists shows that many of the bodily changes we have always ascribed to the normal aging process are in fact caused by disuse of the body.

U.S. Surgeon Generals have estimated that close to 85 percent of our most dreaded diseases could be prevented with appropriate lifestyle changes. Exercise will allow people to not only survive, but to thrive! Age is no excuse for infirmity!

Here at BAER Fit, we want everyone to be able to do what they want to do in life. Retiring does not mean dying! We have been involved in training people of all ages to be healthier for 30 years. I, Charles Baerman, am 67 years old and have never flunked my physical. My numbers are always right on. My wife Kimberley Baerman, is 60 years old and walks our dogs daily 3-5 miles, workouts 3-4 times a week and looks 15 years younger than she is and is VERY healthy. Pat M. is 80 years old. Trains twice a week here at BAER Fit, runs a ranch and raises horses. She is busy seven days a week. Jack H. is 80 years old and trains twice a week here. He also volunteers for many organizations and his church, rides his bike 20-40 miles a week, cooks all his own food and is very healthy. Nancy S. is 80 years old and trains here at BAER Fit. She also travels, bird watches, go to her rec center a couple times a week and bike rides 15-20 miles each week. I can go on and on, but the flip side of the coin I also see. People 50 and YOUNGER, that cannot keep up with the older people who have been active. They prefer to overeat, eat processed foods, skip workouts and their cardio consists of browsing the shopping centers at best. 30-year old’s that cannot keep up with 70-year old’s!

Yes, you can change your life…at any age. That means start now.

The Top Ten Benefits of Exercise for Older Adults

  1. Maintenance of a high level of physical and social activity increases the quality of life, enhancing social satisfaction.
  2. Increased independence is enjoyed when fitness and health are maintained. Most Americans fear infirmity and dependence more than death.
  3. A person has more energy and can perform daily routines with greater ease.
  4. Increased muscle tone and flexibility improve balance, decreasing falls.
  5. The more muscle tissue a person maintains, the higher his metabolism, making it easier to control weight.
  6. Calories burned through exercise allow a person to rake in more nutrients.
  7. Exercise delays loss of bone mass.
  8. Posture improves, decreasing backache and enhancing appearance.
  9. Cardio-respiratory function is enhanced, improving peripheral circulation and decreasing risk of atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, and other circulatory problems.
  10. Using it keeps you from losing it!

Charles Baerman PhD, CFT, CSFN, CET

937-238-4503 cell

937-748-9905 office

baerfit@gmail.com

www.baerfit.com


Picking a GREAT Personal Trainer / Health Coach

After 40 years in the fitness industry, I am still amazed how people pick trainers: the people they put in charge of their health, their future. People will believe a magazine article, thinking it was written about and for them; or choose a trainer because they look like a body builder, or because they are skinny. Maybe you chose them because they were cheap? (ya, that’s how much I value my life.) Despite the facts, that proper nutrition and exercise have been proven time and time again to decrease stress, chronic diseases, obesity and improve the quality of life, increase life expectancy, and lower medical costs, it has been found according to the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition that less than 5% of adults participate in 30 minutes of physical activity every day, and only one in three adults gets the recommended amount of exercise each week. That’s sad.

But if you are part of the 95% that are just hoping nothing goes wrong or gets worse, don’t get freaked out yet. Anyone can improve their health and fitness level, at any age. And you don’t have to work out 2-3 hours a day to get all the benefits of exercise and proper nutrition. At BAER Fit we suggest 60 minutes a day, taking care of YOU. OK, some of you are saying that’s still a lot of time. It’s really a very small investment when you look at the benefits, and how it can add years of quality life. Do you want to be a real participant in life, or just sit around and watch?

If you’re not sure of what to do or how to get started, keep reading. You’re about to learn what a great trainer should be, and how to become a great client.

  • Before you even start looking for a trainer, know what your goals are. Do you want to only lose weight? Then you really don’t want a strength coach. Maybe you want to lose weight, gain some strength and recover from past medical issues. Then you want a trainer who will work with your doctors and create programs and nutrition for your goals and new lifestyle. In any case, have a good idea of what you want to achieve so you can convey that to the prospective trainer.

At BAER Fit we always ask your goals, then help you refine them and break them down into manageable, achievable steps. We will work with your doctors, or if you need one, we’ll refer you or help you find one.

  • All trainers are not alike. As a matter of fact, there are NO regulations or laws pertaining to personal training. It is not a legal requirement to be certified or have any high school or college education. That’s right! No laws. It’s up to the individual and the gym or training center to at least have the decency to hire only certified and educated people. Any gym “muscle head” or “cardio queen” can put on a shirt that says “personal trainer” and charge you money, and then risk your health and maybe life. Ask any perspective trainer you are thinking of hiring for their education, certification and experience. References are a good thing to get.

Here at BAER Fit all of our trainers have high school and college educations, as well as multiple nationally recognized certifications in training, nutrition, exercise therapy, health coaching, youth and senior fitness and many more. We don’t ever take your health lightly. And for a start on our references, go to our web site testimonials. We currently work with 150-200 people a week. This year is our 30-year anniversary.

  • Be sure you have a good vibe about your prospective trainer. No matter how well educated or experienced the trainer may be, if their personality doesn’t mesh with yours, it probably won’t get you success. Be sure they can explain things in a way that you understand. They should also be professionally friendly. And you should feel that at all times they have your health, goals and desires as their number one concern.
  • Costs are of course important to everyone. But don’t pick a trainer just because they are the cheapest or most expensive. Cost does not always reflect quality. Typical costs across our area in south Ohio are $45.00 to $98.00 per session, with discounts for packages, groups or contracts. This normally does not include certified nutrition plans.

BAER Fit costs are in the lower third of the range and include nutrition plans. Fact is we include everything in one low price. And NO long term contracts or gym fees.

  • There are other things to consider. Be sure that the business and the trainer carry full liability insurance and that it is current. The trainer should also be CPR and AED certified and the facility should have a working AED on site. Make sure they have all the proper forms, including a medical background. They should discuss any previous or current injuries, surgeries, medical conditions and medications. If they do not, consider that a red flag. The trainer needs to know these in order to do a safe program. I actually heard a client tell a “big box gym trainer” that she had MS. The trainer asked what MS was! And she already had the clients program ready. Be sure the trainer asks and knows about any conditions and that they understand how to work with those conditions.

At BAER Fit we have all these concerns covered.

When you are ready, contact us and come in for a free consultation. You will learn what we can do for you and we can learn more about you.